Sandra Kerr OBE to sit on IPPR Commission on Economic Justice

|SandraKerr IPPR CEJ

Today, the IPPR has launched a two-year programme to examine the challenges facing the economy and make practical recommendations for its reform. The landmark Commission on Economic Justice aims to rethink economic policy for post-Brexit Britain.

I am delighted that this Commission does not plan to shirk the research and scrutiny of these thorny issues - that if tackled effectively can tangibly contribute to greater economic inclusion and deliver better outcomes for many without excluding those in most in need of change.

- Sandra Kerr OBE,
Race Equality Director

The Commission aims to set out fresh proposals to achieve sustainable growth and broadly-shared prosperity, and is launched alongside a new report from IPPR which shows that “the UK economy has fundamental problems which require far-reaching change”. New polling for IPPR by YouGov shows that only a fifth (21%) of the public believe the British economy works for the majority of the people, is fair.

On being appointed a Commissioner for the project, Sandra Kerr OBE said: “I am delighted that this Commission does not plan to shirk the research and scrutiny of these thorny issues - that if tackled effectively can tangibly contribute to greater economic inclusion and deliver better outcomes for many without excluding those in most in need of change.”
 
Sandra joins leading figures from across society – from business and trade unions civil society organisations and academia – to examine the challenges facing the UK economy and make practical recommendations for its reform. It aims to ‘rewrite the rules’ of the economy.

Speaking at the launch event this morning, Sandra Kerr spoke about employment inequalities experienced by people from an ethnic background, as well as the ongoing challenge around pay gaps across multiple characteristics of age, gender or ethnicity: 

One in 4 children in the UK in primary and secondary school education are from a Black Asian and Minority Ethnic Background. We need to plan for the future. The demography of the future talent pipeline in the UK is changing.

One in 8 of the working age population are from a minority ethnic background, yet only 1 in 10 are in the workplace.  Closing this persistent unemployment rate gap will surely contribute positively to the UK economy.

Eradicating disproportionate levels of under employment – this is people working part-time would want to work full-time and people working within an organisation at much lower levels than their education, skills and abilities – what a waste of talent.  There is also the ongoing challenge of pay gaps to close – be they gender, age or ethnicity.

Socio economic background whatever your ethnicity White working class or non-white, it should not be a barrier to an individual’s effective participation in the labour market where they can use their skills and talents.

More information about the IPPR Commission on Economic Justice can be found here: www.commissiononeconomicjustice.org